It’s long been known that women become forgetful once they have been through pregnancy.  I have been through thrice.  Will that make me 3 times more forgetful?

9 months after delivery, I have much problem remembering things. Below are some frustrating examples:

  • I can’t remember where I’ve kept things the day before.
  • I can be in the middle of a conversation and stop short of remembering what I want to say.
  • I can’t remember what I am searching for after filtering out my emails by a certain name.
  • I can be concentrating on doing a task, and forget about it when I return from a conversation with a peer.
  • I’ll walk into a room and forget what I want to find 

This makes me rather frustrated with myself.  I feel less competent.  I wonder if I am suffering from some health problems.  Has this something to do with my earlier stress state?  Am I still suffering from too much fatigue?  Have I allow excessive stress to creep in again and my brain is protesting while I am still oblivious to the warning signs?

A good friend told me that I probably have too much worries at the back of my mind with such thoughts working unconsciously.  Kel said I have too much nitty gritty details on my mind such that my memory card is more than full.  Now, I am worried because it is affecting much of my daily life.

I need to find some ways to manage this forgetfulness:

1. Jotting down

At work, I jot down information fast and furious before I turn my head and that information vanished in the air.  It really literally happens that way now.  On my way home, when I sort out some home and weekend schedule, I will jot down notes in my Galaxy calendar, or in Evernote.

2. Eating well

I am eating a balanced diet but I think I need more brain foods.  A search on the internet shows up the following brain foods that boost memory and I was heading to the supermarket to get some of these before I even finished reading up:

  • Salmon, sardines and herring – rich in omega-3 essential fatty acids, which are essential for brain function
  • Blueberries, pomegranate drink – high anti-oxidant properties that prevent the brain from the damage of free radicals.  These foods can delay dementia and age-related conditions.
  • Avocadoes – high levels of monosaturated fats that boost the heart and blood flow to the brain for healthy brain function.
  • Nuts and seeds – high in vitamin E with benefits that correspond with less cognitive decline as you grow older.
  • Whole-grains like oatmeal, wholemeal bread, etc – promotes cardiovascular health which promotes blood flow to all organs including the brain of course. Healthy blood flow to the brain promotes healthy brain function which includes boosting memory.
  • Beans – stabilize glucose (blood sugar) levels. The brain is dependent on glucose for fuel.

3. Upkeep my blog

Perhaps I’ll forget much of my kids growing up years. I may forget the joy, the laughter, the challenges, the tears.  I want to re-read all my blogs when I grow old and when dementia sinks in.  Hopefully I’ll still remember I have a blog and its URL.

4. Sleeping well

I know I will not be sleeping well with the kind of schedule in our house around the baby.  But I will have to work towards an earlier sleep time.  I will have to spend earlier quality evening time with all the kids without being disturbed over dirty floors and unwashed dishes.  That means I need to bring their nights out earlier to 1030pm from the current 11+pm which is rather late for young children.  Then, I will be able to go to bed before 11pm which allows me to sleep for a continuous 4-6 hours before the baby wakes up for night feed.  This should get better as the baby grows up.

5. Take things slow

I am an impatient person and one who wish to do everything perfectly in the fastest time possible.  I need to change that to lessen my load on my body and brain. It has taken me years to learn to slow down and sadly I have not been successful in it. It’s all about mindset change and a determination to slow my pace.  Maybe I should think along the line of aging faster if I continue a fast pace life.  Hey! Maybe that’ll help!

This forgetfulness has led me to understand my 85 years old grandma more as we can see her dementia sets in day by day.  I don’t mind repeating things to her and every time she sees me with the baby, it’s as if she sees him for the first time and there she’ll ask me again how many children I have now.  She cannot control dementia and it’s important that we understand this and be patient with her.

It’s no fun forgetting things.  While we can still control things and before old age renders us helpless, we should take good care of ourselves, have a good lifestyle, eat well, sleep well and maintain a happy and positive mind, hopefully to delay aging and its related inconveniences.

Do you have bouts of forgetful boos boos to share?